Parkland killings highlight relevance of annual northeast Johnson County active shooter training

first_imgThe annual northeast Johnson County inter-agency active shooter training had already been on the books for months when a former student entered Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in February and murdered 17 people.But that shooting, which has reinvigorated the national discussion about how to keep schools safe from gun violence, highlighted the need for emergency responders to be prepared for any situation.Organizers of the training had already planned to run officers through scenarios where they were the first responder on the scene when they started scripting out this year’s exercises in November. The controversy around the decision of the Parkland campus officer at the scene not to enter the building after the shooting started made those scenarios all the more relevant as officers went to work this week at Antioch Church in Overland Park.“There has been a lot of focus on should that officer have gone in or not gone it,” said Leawood Police Brad Robbins. “Every situation is so fluid, it’s tough to predict what’s going to happen. We at least want to subject our officers to it, let them see it, and let them formulate in their minds how they are going to respond.”This year’s scenarios also put officers in situations where they had to work in low-light situations.The training, which brings together police officers from the cities of Westwood, Fairway, Leawood, Merriam, Mission, Overland Park, Prairie Village, Roeland Park as well as from the departments for the Shawnee Mission and Blue Valley School Districts to coordinate with emergency responders from Consolidated Fire District #2 and the Leawood Fire Department, is held each year during the Shawnee Mission School District’s spring break.In the past, it’s been held at a school. But Robbins said using a facility like Antioch Church helps acclimate officers and medical responders to different situations.“While mass shootings are commonly associated with schools, it does happen at businesses,” Robbins said. “It could happen in a church, it could happen in an office building.”He stressed that the hope is that none of the local emergency agencies will ever have to put the training to use. But it’s imperative the departments know how to collaborate to respond to such an emergency.“More and more in our society today, people are solving issues through violence, and often gun violence,” Robbins said. “We are trying to prepare our officers as best we can to respond and minimize the loss of life.”Officers debriefed after running an active shooter scenario.A team of responders enter the building as a scenario begins.Medical crews removed a shooting victim during a training scenario.last_img read more

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Briefly noted: JCCC baseball coach records 1,000th win; Shawnee Mission stops serving romaine over E. coli concerns

first_imgCavaliers baseball coach Kent Shelley is in his 31st season at JCCC. Photo credit JCCC.JCCC’s Shelley marks 1,000 win milestone leading Cavaliers baseball team. Johnson County Community College head baseball coach Kent Shelley last week oversaw his 1,000th win leading the Cavaliers program. With a 19-2 drubbing of Fort Scott Community College last Thursday, Shelley cemented his place in the JCCC record books. Shelley is now in his 31st season with the program.Shawnee Mission stops serving romaine lettuce over concerns about E. coli outbreak. Following a consumer advisory issued by the Centers for Disease Control, the Shawnee Mission School District said Monday it will halt serving romaine lettuce in school cafeterias. “No romaine lettuce will be served in the Shawnee Mission School District until we receive word from the CDC that it’s safe,” read a message to parents from the district. “The CDC has not yet determined a common grower, supplier, distributor or brand associated with the contaminated lettuce.”last_img read more

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Education First Shawnee Mission releases endorsements for general election

first_imgEducation First Shawnee Mission, the advocacy group formed in early 2017 to promote candidates and policies that will support Shawnee Mission schools, has released its endorsements for November’s general elections.“As moms and advocates, we are very excited to support these excellent candidates running for elected office who support Kansas children and our public schools,” said Megan Peters of Education First. “Our endorsed candidates all display a firm commitment to public education and to the issues important to the Shawnee Mission community. We are ready to get to work and spread the word to ensure the voters of Shawnee Mission are informed and ready to vote for our schools on November 6.”The group’s endorsed candidates for November are:House District 14 – Angela Justus Schweller (D)House District 16 – Cindy Holscher (D)House District 17 – Laura Smith – Everett (D)House District 18 – Cindy Neighbor (D)House District 19 – Stephanie Clayton (R)House District 20 – Jan Kessinger (R)House District 21 – Jerry Stogsdill (D)House District 22 – Nancy Lusk (D)House District 23 – Linda Gallagher (R)House District 24 – Jerrod Ousley (D)House District 25 – Melissa Rooker (R)House District 29 – Brett Parker (D)House District 30 – Brandon Woodard (D)Kansas Governor – Laura Kelly (D)Kansas State Board of Education – Ruth GoffThe group distributed surveys to all of the candidates seeking their views on issues including school funding, tax policy, school vouchers and privatization, among others. The responses to those surveys, as well as face-to-face interviews, went into consideration for the final endorsement decisions.You can see a copy of the group’s survey here.Peters said the group is committed to strengthening the public education system because it serves as the foundation for the entire community.“Strong public schools are proven to enhance community income levels, economic growth and business opportunities,” Peters said. “We are proud to have fantastic educators and students in the Shawnee Mission Community, and we look forward to supporting candidates who understand the connection between quality public education and economic prosperity.”last_img read more

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Prairie Village council approves new ordinance regulating drone use on split vote

first_imgPhoto credit UAVAIR Australia. Used under a Creative Commons license.On a narrow vote Monday, the Prairie Village City Council adopted a new ordinance that will regulate the use of drones in the city .Approval of the measure came three years after the governing body first began considering the idea in response to concerns about the potential for drones to pose a threat to privacy, among other issues.The ordinance, approved on a 7-5 vote, makes it illegal to fly drones over someone else’s private property or above crowds without prior approval. The ordinance also includes provisions banning people from piloting drones while intoxicated or using them for surveillance purposes.Mission Hills and Mission Woods have passed similar ordinances.Penalties for a violation of the ordinance in Prairie Village could include a fine of up to $500 or a month in jail.Mayor Eric Mikkelson has been a vocal proponent of the idea since its inception, and again on Monday argued strongly in favor of the ordinance’s adoption. Mikkelson noted that there have been a handful of incidents in which residents have complained about drones of unknown origin flying over their homes. He also cited the incident at the Jazz Festival in 2017 where a drone flying a banner over the Harmon Park hill spooked some in the crowd. With the proliferation of drones in the country, Mikkelson said, the concerns about how they are used is likely to grow.“How ever many of these incidents we have had in the past, I think it’s a good bet we will have more in the future,” he said.But other members of the governing body voiced concerns about enforceability and the potential to expose people to legal liability for minor violations made unintentionally. Councilwoman Serena Schermoly said she had purchased drones without cameras on them for her children. She said she was concerned that if a kid inadvertently piloted a drone over someone’s property, they could be found in violation of the ordinance.Councilman Ron Nelson raised civil rights concerns, saying that, although he had every faith in the police department today, he worried that the ordinance as written had the potential to be misused in the future. He said there wasn’t enough of a problem with drone use in the city at this point to justify an ordinance.“The concern is how good laws and good agencies can be turned to misuse at the desire of a single person or group of people,” Nelson said.One resident who spoke, however, urged the council to adopt the measure, noting that she had had a drone of unknown origin fly over her own backyard when her kids were outside.“Prairie Village should stay ahead of the curve and give the PVPD the necessary tools to address drone abuse,” said Inga Selders, who is running against Schermoly for the city council. “There are no real downsides in enacting this ordinance, but there are a number of downsides if we don’t.”Councilmembers Jori Nelson, Tucker Poling, Sheila Myers, Terrence Gallagher, Chad Andrew Herring, Ted Odell and Dan Runion voted in favor of the ordinance. Councilmembers Schermoly, Ron Nelson, Andrew Wang, Brooke Morehead and Courtney McFadden voted against it.last_img read more

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Confidence Is a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

first_imgYoubeauty: Chances are, you have seen the low-confidence death spiral up close at some point in your life. You go to a meeting and someone gets up to give a presentation. He clearly doesn’t have command of the material, so he talks softly into his collar using a shaky voice. Someone asks him to speak up and he loses his composure. While people may feel bad for the speaker, compassion won’t change the fact that any chance he had to convey his point is lost.…The reason that your own level of confidence matters is that people often need help making judgments about quality. The psychologist Dan Ariely performed an interesting experiment. He had people contemplate the value of him reading his own poetry. For some people, he first asked them how much they would be willing to pay to hear him read his poetry. Others were asked how much they would need to be paid to hear him read his poetry. Later, people felt that Ariely’s poetry was more desirable if they were asked how much they would be willing to pay than if they were asked how much they would need to be paid. (In many ways, this is like the story of Tom Sawyer charging people to paint his fence.)Read the whole story: Youbeauty More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Saudi Arabia reports 5 new MERS cases

first_imgSaudi Arabia reported 5 new MERS-CoV cases late last week, 3 of them in Buraydah, while the World Health Organization (WHO) provided new details on 6 recently confirmed cases, half from Buraydah and 4 linked to hospitals.Buraydah has now had 26 MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus) cases since Mar 3.Buraydah cases under investigationNone of the newly reported MERS cases in Buraydah have been confirmed to be linked to a large hospital outbreak there, the Saudi Ministry of Health (MOH) said in updates on Mar 18 and 19. One proved fatal.The two Buraydah cases confirmed on Mar 18 involve Saudi men, ages 60 and 66, both in stable condition, the MOH said. The case noted on Mar 19 involves a 56-year-old Saudi woman who died. The source of infection for all three cases is under investigation.The other cases confirmed on Mar 19 involve a 19-year-old foreign man in Al-Kharj and a 55-year-old foreign man in Ha’il. The former, in stable condition, had recent contact with a camel. The older man, who is hospitalized in critical condition, also has a “primary” infection, meaning he did not contract the disease from another patient. But no camel contact is specified.None of the five new patients are healthcare workers, the MOH said.The agency also said on Mar 18 that a 45-year-old man in Al-Kharj died from the disease. His case had been confirmed earlier. He is not a health worker and had preexisting disease.The country has now had 1,351 MERS-CoV cases since the outbreak began in 2012, including 575 deaths, the MOH said.WHO notes 3 infected hospital workersThe WHO report, meanwhile, includes details on three patients in Buraydah, all of whom work in the outbreak hospital, and on patients in Ha’il, Riyadh, and Al Makhwah.The Buraydah patients are all foreign women, ages 25, 29, and 31. The 29-year-old works as a janitor in the outbreak hospital, while the occupations of the other two are not specified. The WHO said all the infections are asymptomatic, and the women are in home isolation. Epidemiologic investigation on possible links with other MERS-CoV cases for all three is ongoing.They tested positive for MERS-CoV on either Mar 10 or Mar 11.The case in Ha’il, meanwhile, involves a 48-year-old man who developed symptoms on Mar 8 and was hospitalized Mar 10. He is in stable condition.The patient in Riyadh is a 74-year-old woman who became sick Mar 3 and was hospitalized on Mar 9. She is in critical condition. Both patients tested positive on Mar 11.The final patient is an 83-year-old man from Al Makhwah who was hospitalized on Mar 6 for an unrelated condition. But while hospitalized he developed MERS-like symptoms on Mar 8 and tested positive for the virus on Mar 10. He is in stable condition, the WHO said.All three of the non-Buraydah patients have underlying disease, the agency said.The WHO has now confirmed 1,690 MERS cases, including at least 603 deaths.See also:Mar 18 MOH updateMar 19 MOH updateMar 18 WHO news releaselast_img read more

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Microbiologist highlights diagnostics, engagement to fight AMR

first_imgHosam Zowawi, PhD, is a bit of an evangelist for antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and he’ll enlist anyone in his cause to get the message out.When the Saudi-born clinical microbiologist is not in his lab at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, researching drug-resistant infections, he’s talking to school children in the Middle East about the importance of hand hygiene, giving TEDx talks on the threat of superbugs, making videos to promote prudent use of antibiotics, and working with artists to create social media campaigns about the threat of AMR.For Zowawi, the effort to engage the public, either through scientific papers or Twitter messages, is an important part of the war on superbugs. And it’s important to do so in a way that makes a very complex topic approachable. “It’s very important to simplify science to the public,” Zowawi told an audience last night at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. “But it’s also important to cultivate the next generation of activists.”In a wide-ranging talk  on the AMR threat hosted by Global Minnesota, Zowawi gave an overview of how drug resistance has emerged since the discovery of penicillin, and how it now threatens the medical breakthroughs—like organ transplants and chemotherapy—that were enabled by the introduction of antibiotics. “Today, we are under threat,” he said.The need for rapid diagnosticsWhile Zowawi mostly deals with drug-resistant pathogens under the microscope, he has seen the human impact of AMR. As an infection-control trainee at a hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, he witnessed how drug-resistant infections could be deadly for patients undergoing routine operations.The rapid rise of multidrug-resistant infections in Saudi Arabia and throughout the Middle East led Zowawi and his colleagues to create the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Surveillance Network for Antimicrobial Resistance—a network of labs across the Gulf states that track the spread of AMR bacteria.In addition to his work on surveillance, Zowawi spoke at length about a particular thrust of his research—the search for ways improve diagnosis of bacterial infections, which he believes could lead to more appropriate use of antibiotics.”I think what is tangible and achievable in our lifetime is to improve diagnosis,” Zowawi told Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH, who moderated part of the conversation. Osterholm is the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, which publishes CIDRAP News.The problem, Zowawi explained, is that identifying bacterial infections hasn’t changed that much since the days of Louis Pasteur. “We rely still on our senses,” he said. For example, microbiologists still grow bacteria samples from patients in a petri dish so they can see and identify them under the microscope. Sometimes they even smell bacterial samples to identify them.”These practices are basically showcasing how behind we are,” Zowawi said. “We haven’t really capitalized on the existing technologies that are available to improve upon the current method.”The main problem with the current method is how time-consuming it is. Using a pediatric patient with a bloodstream infection as an example, Zowawi took the audience through the process of diagnosing and identifying a bacterial infection. First, a blood sample is taken. If it comes back positive in 24 hours, clinical microbiologist will then grow the bacteria in a petri dish and identify the pathogen. That takes another 24 hours. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing takes an additional 24 hours.That’s 3 days to understand what’s causing the infection and determine what antibiotics should be avoided.  In the meantime, doctors have already begun empiric therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics to fight the infection, relying on observation, experience, and instinct to choose the right drug. “If you look up the word ’empiric’ in the dictionary, it’s basically guessing,” Zowawi said.And if they want to go even further and understand why the bugs are resistant to certain antibiotics, clinical microbiologists need to conduct molecular tests to identify resistance mechanisms. “It takes days, at least to get the results,” Zowawi said.To speed up this process, Zowawi and his colleagues have developed a test—dubbed “Rapid Superbug”—that searches bacteria for up to 200 genes that make beta-lactamase enzymes, which can disable beta-lactam antibiotics like penicillin and carbapenems. The test can produce results in 3 to 4 hours.Zowawi believes this technology, combined with rapid point-of-care tests that quickly identify bacterial infections, could cut the time it takes to diagnose and properly treat bacterial infections in half. That kind of innovation would not only save lives but would also reduce the unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.”If we can eradicate the empirical use of antibiotics, I think we can achieve a lot,” he said.Osterholm, who refers to AMR as a “slow-moving, glacial tsunami,” agreed that new diagnostic technology will play a key role in reducing the superbug threat, along with new antibiotics and alternative treatments for bacterial infections. But he also reminded the audience of the role they can play. “Do not ask for an antibiotic unless you really need it,” he said.last_img read more

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Prime Minister Rowley and President Granger Sign Energy MOU

first_img Oct 1, 2020 Sep 4, 2020 Two Major Leaps Towards a Climate Resilient, Emission-Free… CARICOM Energy Ministers Meet Caribbean Voices in Virtual Island Summit 2020 (Office of the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago) Prime Minister Dr the Honourable Keith Rowley and President of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana His Excellency Brigadier David Granger signed a Memorandum of Understanding on Energy Sector Cooperation today Wednesday 19 September, 2018 (at State House, Georgetown, Guyana). Prime Minister Rowley said today represents a documentation of his country’s commitment to do more in its neighbourly relations with Guyana with respect to the generation of economic activity. President David Granger and Prime Minister Keith Rowley exchange copies of the MOU (Photo via Ministry of the Presidency) CDF, IRENA Collaborate to Boost Low-Carbon Investments in… center_img Sep 29, 2020 He said both Governments were laying the ground work and providing the encouragement for the private sector to seize opportunities which are available to both countries at this time and that this was a good thing for the people of Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana. President Granger said he was confident that the combination of Guyana’s natural resources with the entrepreneurial expertise, capital and investment from Trinidad and Tobago would result in a win-win situation for both countries. He noted that there were unjustified fears that the signing of this agreement was tantamount to giving away the family jewels. “This is not true, it is simply a means of collaborating, not only in production but in marketing, in gas, in treating with oil spills and multi-national corporations.” “The MOU is a means of benefitting from Trinidad and Tobago’s advice, their experience and expertise that they have built up over a long time. So the fears that this is some give away are completely unjustified,” President Granger said. Prime Minister Rowley said he was disappointed by the sentiment expressed by some that this was a Trinidad and Tobago takeover of Guyana’s good fortune. “It is my expectation that any and all investment in Trinidad and Tobago from Guyana and vice versa will be something that will be welcomed and encouraged and that participation in our economies will be good for all of us.” He added, “We in Trinidad and Tobago are proud to have the record show that as a small developing country, which was not a member of the Paris Club, when Guyana sought debt forgiveness we in Trinidad and Tobago wrote off billions of dollars of Guyana’s debt. “We are not holding that as any quid pro quo but it is circumstantial in our position that we are a friendly cooperating neighbor of Guyana.” Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… You may be interested in… Oct 5, 2020 Energy, agriculture, security high on agenda of Guyana, T&T high-level meeting(Guyana Chronicle) TRINIDAD and Tobago Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley will be accompanied by five of his ministers when he arrives in Guyana this week for bilateral talks with President David Granger. The high-level team from the twin-island republic is scheduled to arrive in Guyana on Wednesday for a two-day…September 17, 2018In “Business”Trinidad and Tobago’s Prime Minister Rowley to meet Guyana’s President Granger WednesdayOPM, Trinidad and Tobago  –   Prime Minister Dr the Honourable Keith Rowley will meet with President of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana, His Excellency Brigadier David Granger when he travels to Guyana for a one-day visit which starts tomorrow (Wednesday 19 September, 2018). Bilateral discussions between the countries will focus…September 18, 2018In “Energy”Guyana seeks technical support for oil and gas take-offPRESIDENT David Granger on Thursday held discussions with top oil and gas officials of Trinidad and Tobago during a meeting at his Shiv Chanderpaul Drive office. T&T Minister of Energy and Energy Industries, Ms. Nicole Olivierre and Deputy Permanent Secretary in her ministry, Mr. Andre Laveau, met with Mr. Granger…August 26, 2016In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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Haldex CFO Announces Resignation

first_imgSTOCKHOLM – Haldex’ Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Andreas Ekberg, has announced his resignation in order to pursue another career opportunity outside the company. To assist with the transition, Ekberg will remain in his position until September 2015.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementHaldex says it will initiate a search for a new CFO, starting promptly.“On behalf of the entire company and our board of directors, we thank Andreas Ekberg for his valuable contribution. With his 17 years in the company, he has been instrumental in the transformation of Haldex and our way towards profitable growth. We wish him all the best in his future endeavors,” said Bo Annvik, president and CEO for Haldex.,Tyrata Inc. and Marubeni Corp. have announced a collaboration for distribution of Tyrata’s IntelliTreadDrive-Over System (DOS) in Japan. Tyrata’s DOS and corresponding data analytics platform have proven effective in the automation of tire tread depth monitoring and Marubeni will be introducing the new technology to its customer base in Japan.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement “As we expand our efforts into the global market, Marubeni is an important element of our distribution strategy,” said Jesko von Windheim, Tyrata’s CEO. “Marubeni not only gives us a capable and trusted sales and service partner in Japan, but they also offer established channels into many other Asian markets.” In connection with the collaboration, Marubeni will obtain the right to distribute and service Tyrata’s DOS in Japan, and Tyrata gains the support of a trusted technology partner in the Japanese market. Marubeni will start introducing DOS units in Japan in the fourth quarter of 2020.  “We see a demand for low-cost, automated tire monitoring across our customer base and we believe that Tyrata’s products meet the cost and performance requirements in this market. Marubeni is pleased to be a partner for Tyrata in Japan and we look forward to providing customers with this innovative new technology,” said Kazuyoshi Hosoi, general manager, Tires and Rubber Materials Department.Advertisementcenter_img Organizations interested in learning more about the IntelliTread portfolio may contact Luka Lojk at mailto:Luka.Lojk@Tyrata.com or +1-704-593-8418. Marubeni will introduce the DOS to Japan and, through demonstration tests with logistics companies, proceed with verification of demand for automatic tire wear measurement, improvement of driver safety, and reduction of tire maintenance costs. Marubeni plans to conclude an exclusive distributor contract with Tyrata after verification. As partners, Marubeni and Tyrata will utilize each other’s knowledge to promote the use of automated wear measurement equipment for tires, thereby contributing to the realization of a safe and smart society.last_img read more

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North Fork News

first_imgBoy Scout Car ShowThe 30th annual Boy Scout Car Show will take place at Peconic Lane School on Saturday, August 31, from 9 AM to 4 PM.Presented by Troop 6 Committee to benefit the troop, the car show will feature antique, steam, classic, collector, street rod, custom cars, and trucks. There also will be a picnic area where attendees can enjoy refreshments and food.General admission is $5 and free for children younger than 12.Arts & Crafts FestivalThe Greenport Arts & Crafts festival will be held on Saturday, August 31, from 10 AM to 5 PM in the Greenport High School.The festival will feature re-purposed arts and crafts with a purpose. For more information, visit www.depasmarket.com.Lysander Piano TrioThe Lysander Piano Trio will perform at the Shelter Island Presbyterian Church on Sunday, September 1, at 8 PM.The ensemble will perform music by Scriabin, Haydn, Favre, and Schubert. There will be a post-concert wine and cheese reception. Admission is free, but donations are accepted. For more information, visit www.shelterislandfriendsofmusic.org.Mattituck-Laurel LibraryThe Mattituck-Laurel Library will host a senior café and conversation on Thursday, September 5, at 11 AM, where seniors can meet for conversation, tea, coffee, and snacks.The library will screen “The Command,” which follows the 2000 K-141 Kursk Submarine disaster, on Friday, September 6, at 1:30 PM.There will be an AARP Safe Driving Course for motor vehicle operators age 50 and over on Saturday, September 7, from 9 AM to 4 PM. The program is $20 for AARP members and $25 for non-members.An eight-week yoga session for all levels will begin on Saturday, September 7, at 9 AM. The fee is $70 for the eight weeks or $15 per walk-in. Participants must bring their own yoga mat or towel.For more information, visit www.mattlibrary.org.gmkotz@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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