Troubleshooting the Altiris Manageability Toolkit for vPro Technology – Part 1 – Provisioning Client Systems

first_imgOOB Trace LoggingOut of Band Management has the ability to log trace details to a debugging program. See the following KB article on details on how to set this up: If the server doesn’t show any incoming ‘Hello’ requests, fire up Wireshark on the local system to see if we see any ‘Hello’ packets heading out. If they are actively leaving, something is blocking the traffic from reaching the Notification Server. These ports are standard TCP calls. See the next section labeled ‘Provision Server’. 2.1 AMT enabled, not in Setup Mode (Password has been changed in the MEBx) SymptomsThe following symptoms point to problems with the local AMT system or its ability to communicate to the Provisioning Server so that Provisioning can occur.System MissingA common symptom for new AMT client systems is that the system, even if believed to be in Setup Mode, doesn’t show up in the Altiris Console under Intel® AMT Systems. The causes vary, but the following methodology should help pinpoint where the problem originates.Is the system sending ‘Hello’ packets? Walk through this procedure to determine if it is or not: AMT enabled, in Setup Mode for Remote Configuration 4 and 5 in ‘Hello’ Packet Mode disabled *This is a repost of this article to the Activation section of the Site*Troubleshooting issues with the Intel® AMT Provisioning process can be a daunting prospect. This series walks through the troubleshooting methods to pinpoint where problems originate and how to fix them. Use Part 1 to troubleshoot the AMT systems when provisioning is not occurring. If the issue is on the client side, this document should provide the tools to diagnose and fix the issue.IntroductionThere are several modes a vPro capable system can be in when it arrives at the customer site. The modes are: Versions 2.0, 2.1, 2.5 do not support Remote Configuration If no entry appears for the system, place Wireshark on both the AMT client and the Server. Now initiate a restart of the ‘Hello’ packet sequence by turning the AMT client off and unplugging it from power. Drain the capacitors by pressing the power button while unplugged. Generally the power LED will light for a moment before fading dark. Plug the system back in. Does the Server show hello packets (sending on port 16994, with destination port 9971) coming in from the system? 2.1 Each of the modes have their own quirks, and understanding the modes will help determine what state a system is in, and how to change a system from one state to another.VersioningIt is important to understand the different versions of not only the local AMT build, but of Altiris’ Out of Band Management with the Intel SCS Component. See the following table: 3.0 AMT AMT disabled 6.2 AMT enabled, not in Setup Mode (factory default) Does the AMT Log contain entries for the system requesting Provisioning? The identifier in the logs is the UUID. One example of an error that would prevent a system from showing up is ‘failed to find PID mapping’, meaning the requesting system is trying to authenticate with a PID that the Server does not have. Either import any keys provided by the OEM or other provider, or manually enter in the PID PPS under the ‘Security Keys’ section of the Provisioning Altiris Console. If you ping ProvisionServer from a command-prompt, do you get the IP Address of the Notification Server? A CNAME record needs to be created in DNS to correctly direct the hello packets. Check page 21 of the Admin guide located at this KB article: for more information. Note the following points when working with the different versions: Intel SCS Intel SCS version 1.2 was unstable. It’s recommended to upgrade to 1.3 or upgrade OOB to 6.2. Trace logging will log everything from console accesses, to oobprov.exe calls from IntelSCS. When oobprov.exe is called, all actions are logged to trace, which can capture problems with the provisioning process.WiresharkWhile the two above tools are distinctly for Out of Band Provisioning, Wireshark tells the whole story of what is coming and going across the wire. It’s important to know what the AMT clients are sending, especially in the ‘Hello’ packet, and what the server is responding with.Wireshark can be obtained from: . While this is the recommended tool, any network trace capture program can be used to examine the network traffic between the AMT client and the Provisioning Server.Altiris KnowledgebaseAll know errors and issues we’ve run across have been documented in the Altiris Knowledgebase. If you have a specific error, search in the KB and see if we have a documented fix for it. Access it directly here: Versions 2.5 and 2.6 are notebooks 2.6 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.5 2.1 1.3 AMT enabled, in Setup Mode for TLS-PSK 2.0 3.0 If no ‘Hello’ packets are being sent, the system may be in a non-Setup State. At the AMT system access the Intel MEBx by pressing Ctrl+P at startup. Is the password what was setup during Setup Mode, or will it only accept Admin? If none of the valid passwords work, this machine may be in an unworkable state. Unplug the CMOS battery for 15 seconds to put the machine back in Factory Default Mode, and Setup as necessary. If the network cannot support this CNAME, only two methods remain. You can set the Provision Server IP in the MEBx directly. You can also use the RCT tool to simulate the Hello packet and send it to the NS directly (see the previous link to the article on RCT usage). Versions 2.2 and 2.6 are not supported for Remote Configuration unless Intel SCS is upgraded to version 3.2.1. Check the following KB articles for more information: AMT SetupEach mode for AMT sets the system in a specific state. See the brief descriptions below of how AMT acts in each state: 3.0 Another place you can test the DNS functionality is under Provisioning in the Altiris Console. Select the ‘DNS Configuration’ node. Click the ‘Test’ button to initiate the test. A correct IP Address signifies that DNS is working correctly from the Notification Server. The ping test is still important to signify that the client can also resolve the name. AMT enabled, not in Setup Mode (factory default) – This is the required mode to use USB One-Touch for provisioning. If a user or the OEM has logged into the MEBx and changed the password, the system is no longer in factory default and the One Touch method will not work. AMT enabled, in Setup Mode for TLS-PSK – All Provisioning is encrypted using TLS, however the inner security workings can differ. For Pre-shared Key (known as PID PPS) a public and private key are used. The manufacturer can set a specific PID PPS on the system or a user can auto-generate them. The key is that both the client and server have to have the key in order for authentication to work. AMT enabled, in Setup Mode for Remote Configuration – All 2.2, 2.6, and 3.0 version AMT systems come in this mode unless the OEM is explicitly instructed to set it differently. The point of Remote Configuration is to avoid visiting the AMT system in order to get it provisioned for manageability use. 2.0 2.0 Troubleshooting ToolsBefore we get into the actual symptoms, we’ll cover the tools used to determine where the problem is coming from. While not easy to use, the logging capabilities allow us to verify if the correct processes are functioning on the local system.AMT LogsThe Altiris Console has direct ties into the AMT Logs captured in the IntelAMT database as a normal part of operation. The Logging level is set in the Altiris Console under View > Solutions > Out of Band Management > Configuration > Provisioning > Configuration Service Settings > and select General. Debug Warning is recommended so you get both Errors and Warnings.The logs are accessed from Provisioning > Logs > and select ‘Log’. Entries here will reveal problems during the provisioning process and other Intel SCS functions. OOBM Versions 2.2 and 2.6 are upgrades to versions 2.0, 2.1 and 2.5 respectively and provide the additional functionality of using Remote Configuration for Provisioning 6.1 AMT disabled – In this situation AMT must be enabled either manually by looking into the Intel MEBx (Ctrl+P at startup) or by using the RCT Tool. The following article covers the use of this tool, including data on the command-line switch that can be used to enable AMT: ConclusionPart 2 of this series covers the Server components for Provisioning. If you’ve read all the symptoms and suggestions, you’ll note that there is crossover when troubleshooting between the client and the server, regardless of where the problem lies. See Part 2 for the continuation of Provisioning Troubleshooting. AMT enabled, not in Setup Mode (Password has been changed in the MEBx) – One Touch will not work, but manually entering the PSK or setting into Remote Configuration mode will allow the system to enter Setup Mode. Provision ServerWith Wireshark we can prove a system is sending ‘Hello’ packets out on the wire. The destination is an important distinction as usually this will be simply the name ProvisionServer. By default, Remove Configuration and TLS-PSK will target the simple name ProvisionServer. It’s up to the administrator to properly direct that Hello packet to the Notification Server. 2.5 3.2.1 1.2 Modes 4 and 5 in ‘Hello’ Packet Mode disabled – This is common if the system is not immediately hooked up to the production network. All systems will fall into this state if they transmit the ‘hello’ packet for 24 hours.last_img read more

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Can We Outrun/Outcompute the Data Avalanche? (Part 3)

first_imgI’ve written about the big data problem and asserted some ideas on what makes up an ideal infrastructure. Let’s look at the some progress I think is relevant.At SGI we’ve been wrestling with the big data problem for many years now and we’re continuing to building and integrating systems with the attributes we feel are ideal for data intensive computing. More recently we’ve been encouraged by the potential of Intel’s 5500 series Xeon Processor (code named Nehalem) to take on the data intensive computing problem. We have run various “Data Intensive” performance benchmarks using the SGI Altix ICE platform along with the Intel Xeon Processor 5500 Series to see how well the combination would handle real world Data Intensive Computing.The results have been outstanding and represent material progress in sustainable efficiency for big data problems. The new system delivers reliably scalable performance gains of up to 140 percent over current generation systems across a variety of data-intensive applicationsSo, can we outrun the data avalanche? We can discuss that more in the intel.com/server discussion room, but I think the answer is that we don’t really have a choice if we want to survive. It is just a matter of figuring out the best approach to keeping one step ahead of the huge amounts of data cascading towards us and if I have my way, a better quality of live by feeling less stress from that data yoke on my shoulders.I recently co-authored a technical white paper on Data Intensive Computing that will provide you a bit more insight on this topic. Feel free to download at http://www.sgi.com/pdfs/4154.pdf….last_img read more

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Intelligent Performance Meets Embedded Security for Computacenter, Noledge, and Ordnance Survey

first_imgFor intelligent performance with embedded security, three companies have recently turned to Intel® Core™ vPro™ processors: Computacenter Gets the Power of Mobile Touch: A leading IT services provider proves the potential of touch-enabled Intel® technology-powered tablet PCs with Microsoft Windows* 8.Noledge Takes the User Experience to the Next Level with Touch-Enabled Technology: Noledge takes advantage of Windows* 8 on touch-enabled Ultrabook™ convertibles powered by Intel® Core™ vPro™ processors to improve its offering to business users.Ordnance Survey Navigates a Mobile Strategy: Ordnance Survey finds potential in Intel® Core™ i5 vPro™ processor-powered tablets for technical and customer-facing users.You can read all about it in our three new business success stories. Find more like these on Intel.com and iTunes. And to keep up to date on the latest business success stories, be sure to follow ReferenceRoom on Twitter.*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.last_img read more

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Should Technology be Trusted?

first_imgThe computing technology market is entering a turning point for change.  The need for TRUST.  Cybersecurity is about making computing technology and services secure.  Trust is an important yet still under recognized component.  Times are changing and the value of trust is rising.Recently the government of China, the world’s largest emerging market for technology, banned mainstream hardware, operating systems, and security software from government use.  With the predominance of companies in the country being government owned, it is likely they too will consider such recommendations. The United States, Russia, and other countries have done so in the past on occasion.  Other nations and regions may follow suit in the practice of forbidding the governmental use of products they determine untrustworthy.  Such announcements influence the commercial and consumer communities and can sway decisions to voluntarily adopt the same practices.  This trend will continue to increase and force technology providers to rethink the value of trustworthy products in the global marketplace.  Trust will become an important competitive advantage. Such actions have a serious economic effect, both on individual companies as well as the entire technology sector.  Cisco indicated an expected 10% drop in quarterly revenue due in part from privacy issues related to the Snowden affair.  This is being coined the “Snowden effect” by many.  The repercussions can be felt in large contract negotiations as well, with Verizon and Boeing being two recent examples in the news. It has been estimated privacy issues alone may account for a 4% slowdown in the growth of US technology services industry.  But the concept of trust reaches much farther and deeper.  The World Economic Forum estimates a $3 trillion aggregate economic impact of cybersecurity on technology trends through 2020.  Security issues drag against the sale, adoption, and sustainment of systems, solutions, and services, thus impacting the innovation investment in those technology sectors.  It is a chain reaction which can slow the worldwide digital revolution juggernaut that is enriching the lives of almost every person on the planet. Some might call these events as isolated or place blame on a few companies or even a single person.  But the truth is we are all to blame.  The same cycle has played out over time in other sectors.  Early adoption of new technology products and services has typically expanded to include greater expectations for quality and reliance.  This is part of the normal evolution of end-user perspectives.  Cars, planes, televisions, operating systems, high-speed Internet connections, and cellular service are all examples where over time the security, reliance, quality, and safety expectations emerged well after the initial wave to obtain the latest revolutionary gadgets.  The swoon of adoption gives way to practical considerations as customers eventually realize possessing the newest technology or services is not enough.  Trust in the secure reliability, service levels, and safety is an important competitive element which cannot be overlooked. Cybersecurity is the protection of computing capabilities and is beginning this transition to drive trust into the high technology marketplace.  Ranging from governments or consumers, we are at the point when suppliers and security organizations must commit more focus to bolster the confidence of their products and services, including hardware, firmware, operating systems, applications, and services.  The value of trust is too great and the consequences are potentially devastating.  Security issues, if left unchecked, will impede the health, innovation, and adoption of the greater compute technology industry.  There is no going back.  The concepts of Trust will surely rise, as it is a necessary growing pain to a stronger, more healthy, and sustainable electronic ecosystem we all rely upon.- MattTwitter:  @Matt_Rosenquist Opens in a new window    IT Peer Network: My Previous PostsOpens in a new window LinkedIn:  http://linkedin.com/in/matthewrosenquistOpens in a new windowMy Blog:  Information Security StrategyOpens in a new windowlast_img read more

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Improve Your Healthcare IQ

first_imgHealthcare is undergoing massive changes. As a result of these changes many of those that work in the healthcare industry are finding that they need new skills and knowledge. A great way to go about this is participating in a massive open online course (MOOC).The term MOOC was first used by Dave Cormier of the University of Prince Edward Island in 2008. MOOCs are online courses that are built for open and collaborative participation. MOOC courses are often delivered as a pre-recorded series of video lectures with corresponding assignments to test knowledge. Courses are typically self-paced which makes it easy to schedule around work and family commitments. Mobile applications are available for some platforms which makes learning on the go easy (and much more productive than gaming!). Several MOOC platforms have implemented paid certification programs that focus on in-demand skill sets like data science. In addition to the education, most MOOC platforms provide community forums which can be great ways to connect with other individuals around the world with a shared passion for the subject matter.A variety of healthcare related courses are available on various MOOC platforms. A useful tool for selecting courses across platforms is Mooc List. Three of the more common platforms that come up in healthcare related searches are Coursera, edX, and FutureLearn. Each of these platforms has a slightly different focus in terms of course content and geographic distribution of educators. Coursera seems to have the most diverse set of healthcare curriculum today, but interesting course can be found on all three. Below are some of the sample courses available: CourseraInterprofessional Healthcare InformaticsWe will explore perspectives of clinicians like dentists, physical therapists, nurses, and physicians in all sorts of practice settings worldwide. Emerging technologies, telehealth, gaming, simulations, and eScience are just some of the topics that we will consider.Big Data Analytics for HealthcareWe introduce the characteristics and related analytic challenges on dealing with clinical data from electronic health records. Many of those insights come from medical informatics community and data mining/machine learning community. There are three thrusts in this course: Application, Algorithm and SystemedXEntrepreneurship and Healthcare in Emerging EconomiesExplore how entrepreneurship and innovation tackle complex health problems in emerging economies.Practical Improvement Science in Health Care: A Roadmap for Getting ResultsCourse will provide learners with the valuable skills and simple, well-tested tools they need to translate promising innovations or evidence into practice. A group of expert faculty will explore a scientific approach to improvement — a practical, rigorous methodology that includes a theory of change, measurable aims, and iterative, incremental small tests of change to determine if improvement concepts can be implemented effectively in practice.FutureLearnInside Cancer: How Genes Influence Cancer DevelopmentIn this free online course, you’ll learn about the fundamental biological concepts that inform our current understanding of cancer development, the molecular genetics behind it and its spread within the body.Bioprinting: 3D Printing Body PartsThis free online course tells the story of this revolution, introducing you to commonly used biomaterials, including metals, ceramics and polymers, and how bioprinting techniques, such as selective laser melting, hot-melt extrusion and inkjet printing, work. Through case studies – ranging from hip implants to facial transplants to lab-grown organs – we’ll answer questions such as: What is 3D printing and how did it come about? Is it really possible to print structures that incorporate both living and artificial components? How long before we can print whole body organs for transplants? What is possible right now, and what will be possible in 20 and 50 years’ time?So whatever your reason, take some time to participate in an MOOC. It’s a fantastic way to stimulate new ideas and connect with like-minded individuals around the world.What questions do you have?last_img read more

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University of Nebraska May Restrict Stem Cell Use

first_imgNebraska citizens don’t like the open-ended new Obama policy on research with human embryonic stem cells. So in response to public pressure, the University of Nebraska board of regents will vote tomorrow on whether to limit its researchers to the cell lines allowed under President Bush:… if it approves the restrictions — some opponents of the research say they have the votes, though others remain doubtful — the University of Nebraska would become the first such state institution in the country to impose limits on stem cell research that go beyond what state and federal laws allow, university officials say.For weeks, the Nebraska board of regents has been the focus of a fierce campaign by opponents of embryonic stem cell research, most recently by a flood of e-mail and telephone calls, a petition drive and radio advertisements. Nebraska law already prohibits state funding of research on non-Bush-approved lines.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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White House Proposes Modest Funding Increase for Global Health Programs

first_imgIn the face of a Republican-led effort to slash funding for global health programs, the Obama Administration proposed budget for 2012 calls for slightly increasing the investment on its Global Health Initiative (GHI) by 11% to $9.8 billion. Although several programs go up or down by roughly 10%, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria would receive a 23% boost in its current budget, set in fiscal year 2010, to $1.3 billion. Congress is still formulating a continuing resolution that would fund the federal government through the rest of fiscal year 2011, which started 1 October. The increase “is good news in this funding environment—any boost is, especially if you compare to the level of cuts proposed in the House continuing resolution on Friday,” says Jirair Ratevosian, a policy analyst with the American Foundation for AIDS Research in Washington, D.C.The continuing resolution introduced by the chair of the appropriations committee, Representative Hal Rogers (R-KY), immediately led to loud cries of protest from the global health advocates. In all, it would cut $783.5 million from the main component of GHI, the Global Health and Child Survival effort, which supports treatment and prevention programs for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and neglected tropical diseases and family planning and nutrition efforts. The continuing resolution would take away another $300 million in contributions to the Global Fund.Advocates have spelled out the dire impact they believe the proposed House cuts would have on global health. According to the Health Global Access Project (GAP), a nonprofit based in New York City, the cuts would mean nearly 1.5 million people would likely die for lack of anti-HIV treatment, 12 million families would not receive bednets to prevent malaria, and more than 400,000 would not have access to TB drugs. Health GAP analyst Matthew Kavanagh says global health investments cannot wait for better economic times. “We’re glad amidst the freeze on spending that the president is realizing that things like infectious disease pandemics don’t take a break,” says Kavanagh. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Although HIV/AIDS advocates are the most vocal, many other groups are deeply concerned about the House actions. Peter Hotez of the George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., specializes in neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), a field that has had a roller-coaster ride of hope and despair the last year. The 2010 budget appropriated only $65 million for NTDs, but Obama’s proposed 2011 budget promised to raise that amount to $155 million. The proposed 2012 budget, however, drops that down to $100 million. “It’s such a good buy for public health,” says Hotez, who said an increase would allow the United States to reach beyond the dozen countries it now helps combat NTDs.Helene Gayle, head of CARE USA, worries about cuts to both nutrition and reproductive health. “Undernutrition is one of the most critical issues facing the world’s poor today, affecting virtually all other aspects of a person’s health and well-being,” says Gayle, who notes that it’s ultimately an economic issue, too. “Such drastic cuts in GHI funding will contribute to pushing millions more people around the world into poverty this year, with Africa expected to be hardest hit.” See our complete coverage of Budget 2012.*This item has been corrected. The first version of this story compared the FY2012 budget request for GHI to FY2011. It now compares the FY2012 request to the currently funded amount, which is based on the FY2010 enacted budget. The current Global Fund support is $1.05 billion, not $1 billion, which means the increase donation is actually 24%, not 30% as originally reported.last_img read more

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Top stories: Drunk chimps, dinosaur blood, and irreproducible research

first_imgSigns of ancient cells and proteins found in dinosaur fossilsScientists studying a collection of dinosaur fossils have made an amazing discovery: They’ve uncovered what appear to be ancient dinosaur blood cells and protein fibers. The find suggests that this kind of soft tissue preservation may be more common than anyone had guessed, and it could help us figure out how ancient dinosaur proteins differ from their modern relatives.Study claims $28 billion a year spent on irreproducible biomedical researchSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)An eye-popping $28 billion is spent in the United States each year on preclinical research that can’t be reproduced by other researchers. That’s the conclusion of a provocative analysis published this week by economists and biologists who based their findings on past studies of error rates in biomedical studies. Some researchers have said that the figure may overstate the extent of any problem, but the lead author says it is meant to stimulate discussion.Nomadic herders left a strong genetic mark on Europeans and AsiansHow did the Bronze Age come to Europe and Asia 5000 years ago? Two of the largest studies of ancient DNA from Bronze Age and Iron Age people have now found that outsiders deserve the credit: Nomadic herders from today’s Russia and Ukraine brought their culture with them—and made a lasting imprint on the genetic makeup of Europeans and Asians.Chimps caught drinking after hoursA new study of chimps with easy access to palm wine shows that some drink it enthusiastically and may actually crave it as humans do. The discovery could help us figure out why humans evolved a craving for alcohol, with all its pleasures and pains.World’s heaviest dinosaur just lost tons of weightDreadnoughtus, supposedly the world’s heaviest dinosaur, just lost tons of weight—literally. The massive dino was originally thought to weigh 59 metric tons, as heavy as a herd of elephants. Now, scientists are putting its weight at somewhere between 28 and 38 metric tons. It’s a downsizing of dinosaurian proportions!last_img read more

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In search for unseen dark matter, physicists turn to shadow realm

first_imgThe electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory creates copious photons in the hopes that a few may be dark. JEFFERSON LABORATORY In search for unseen dark matter, physicists turn to shadow realm Scientists hunting unseen dark matter are looking deeper into the shadows. With searches for a favored dark matter candidate—weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs)—coming up empty, physicists are now turning to the hypothetical “dark sector”: an entire shadow realm of hidden particles. The concept “has been percolating for 7 or 8 years, but it’s really coming to the fore now,” says Jonathan Feng, a theorist at the University of California, Irvine (UCI).This week, physicists will meet at the University of Maryland, College Park, for a workshop, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to mull ideas for a possible $10 million dark matter experiment that could go ahead in the next few years. The effort would complement the agency’s current experiments, including the flagship WIMP search, LZ, a $76 million subterranean detector under construction in Lead, South Dakota. And many researchers believe DOE should focus on the dark sector. Jim Siegrist, DOE’s associate director for high-energy physics in Washington, D.C., says the goal is to fill in any gap in DOE’s searches for dark matter, which makes up 85% of the universe’s matter: “Is there anything we’re missing?”WIMPs, dreamed up in the 1980s, once seemed the perfect candidate for dark matter, which shapes the visible universe with its gravity. WIMPs would weigh a few hundred times as much as a proton and interact only through gravity and the weak nuclear force. A simple calculation suggests just enough of them should linger from the big bang to account for dark matter today—a selling point known as the “WIMP miracle.” In addition, WIMPs emerge naturally in many versions of supersymmetry, a concept that solves key technical problems in the standard model of the known particles. However, physicists have yet to detect WIMPs bumping into atomic nuclei in underground detectors. And the world’s most powerful atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland, has seen no sign of supersymmetry or WIMPs. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, supports just such fixed target experiments. In 2010, physicists on the A Prime Experiment at CEBAF searched—without success—for dark photons decaying into telltale electron-positron pairs. Last year, physicists on the Heavy Photon Search used CEBAF to try again. In future accelerator experiments, physicists might simply track the scattered electrons instead, looking for a distinctive kink in an electron’s trajectory that would result when it emits a dark photon.Or, as with WIMP detectors, physicists could try to detect dark-sector particles drifting in Earth’s vicinity. Because WIMPs are heavy, physicists search for them by looking for the recoil of heavy atomic nuclei such as those in liquid xenon. That technique won’t work for much lighter dark-sector particles, which would bounce off a heavy nucleus like ping pong balls off a bowling ball.Instead, physicists could look for the recoil of wispy electrons, perhaps in a device akin to an existing WIMP detector, says Kathryn Zurek, a theorist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Or they could create a frigid bath of light nuclei in “superfluid” helium, and look for tiny quantum vibrations triggered by the collisions. Another option would be to look for the breaking of free-flowing pairs of electrons in a superconducting metal. In part because light dark matter particles would be more numerous than WIMPs, a detector for them could be much smaller and cheaper than a WIMP detector, Zurek says. LZ will contain 7 metric tons of liquid xenon, whereas a detector for light dark matter particles could weigh a kilogram, she estimates.After the workshop, physicists will lay out their ideas in a white paper that DOE will consider over the coming months—although Siegrist cautions the $10 million isn’t guaranteed. Some hope the agency will quickly mount a “shovel ready” experiment, in particular an accelerator-based effort that looks for the dark photon by the kinked-trajectory method. “For $10 million you could build a really nice detector and set it down next to an existing accelerator,” says Timothy Tait, a UCI theorist. Others would prefer to develop techniques to directly detect light dark matter, even if it takes longer to mount an experiment. “I really hope this R&D can be part of the program,” Zurek says.JoAnne Hewett, a theorist at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California, says she hopes DOE will seize the opportunity to launch not just a single experiment, but a more comprehensive 10- to 15-year program to probe the dark sector. Such experiments “cover a very important range and they’re cheap,” she says. “It really makes them must-do experiments.” By Adrian ChoMar. 23, 2017 , 9:00 AM C.BICKEL/SCIENCE In the shadows Dark matter particles predicted by extensions of the standard model have not turned up, so a realm called the dark sector may be probed. The no-shows have led physicists to turn to the dark sector. They speculate that dark matter might consist not of a single massive particle tacked onto the standard model, but of a slew of lighter particles and forces with tenuous connections to known particles (see illustration). For example, in the familiar universe, massless photons convey the electromagnetic force; in the dark sector, a massive dark photon would convey a dark version of electromagnetism. Theorists generally expect that ordinary and dark photons would subtly intertwine or “mix.” Very rarely, then, a particle interaction that would normally produce a high-energy photon would instead produce a dark photon.Higgs bosons and neutrinos would connect similarly to the dark sector. Thanks to these portals, the infant universe should have produced the right amount of dark matter, much as in the WIMP miracle.Dark sector particles would be much lighter than WIMPs—less than the mass of a proton—so physicists don’t need the energy of the LHC to blast them into existence. A much lower energy but intense electron beam could do the trick. When electrons crash into a solid target they radiate abundant photons—and could occasionally generate a dark photon.last_img read more

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Watch a gel embedded with heart cells change color with every beat

first_imgWatch a gel embedded with heart cells change color with every beat Some of the most brilliant displays of color in the natural world, such as a peacock’s iridescent tail and the shimmering wings of the Morpho butterfly, are created not by pigments, but by the microscopic structure of feathers, scales, and skin. Now, inspired by the structural colors produced by chameleons, scientists have created a “living” gel that uses beating heart cells to change its own color.A chameleon’s skin contains tiny crystals that reflect some wavelengths of light but absorb others; it alters the distance between these crystals to change which wavelengths are reflected. To mimic this system, researchers created tightly packed arrays of nanoparticles, and then they poured on a special gel which they hardened and peeled away, leaving a network of tiny pores. Some wavelengths of light disappeared down these holes, while others were reflected, producing vivid colors. The researchers then cultured heart muscle cells from rats onto the gel. These cells beat in synchrony, causing the gel to bend and altering its microscopic structure. This produced a changing color in rhythm with the contraction of the cells, they report today in Science Robotics.The scientists used this biohybrid gel to create a 3D, color-changing butterfly. As the heart cells beat, the butterfly bent its wings back and forth, producing shimmering colors. They also created a “heart-on-a-chip” system to look at the effects of drugs on the gel. When they added isoproterenol, a medication that increases heart rate, the frequency of beating increased—and the color of the gel shifted more. This could be a useful tool to screen new medications, they say, allowing researchers to see drug effects using only the naked eye.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) By Matt WarrenMar. 28, 2018 , 2:00 PMlast_img read more

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